Alexander Ross, The Alcoran of Mahomet, translated out of Arabick into French, by the Sieur Du Ryer, Lord of Malezair, and resident for the French king, at Alexandria. And newly Englished, for the satisfaction of all that desire to look into the Turkish vanities. (1649)

To the Christian Reader.

Religion) hath been already translated into almost all Languages in Christendome, (at least, the most generall, as the Latin, Italian, French, &c.) yet never gained any Proselyte, where the Sword, its most forcible, and strongest argument hath not prevailed: And indeed the greatest Doctors of their Religion have never alledged any thing for the truth thereof; but the success of their wars, and greatness of their Empire, then which nothing is more fallacious: for that which both in former, and these latter Ages hath been common to the bad with th good, cannot be a certain evidence of the justice of a Cause, or the truth of Religion.

Thou shalt finde it of so rude, and incongruous a composure, so farced with contradictions, blasphemies, obscene speeches, and ridiculous fables, that some modest, and more rationall Mahometans have thus excused it; that their Prophet wrote an hundred and twenty thousand sayings, whereof three thousand only are good, the residue (as the impossibility of the Moones falling into his sleeve, the Conversion and Salvation of the

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Alexander Ross, The Alcoran of Mahomet, translated out of Arabick into French, by the Sieur Du Ryer, Lord of Malezair, and resident for the French king, at Alexandria. And newly Englished, for the satisfaction of all that desire to look into the Turkish vanities., London, Printed, Anno Dom., Consulted online at “Quran Archive - Texts and Studies on the Quran” on 17 Aug. 2022: http://quran-archive.org/explorer/alexander-ross/1649?page=3