Marmaduke Pickthall, The Meaning of The Glorious Koran. An Explanatory Translation (1930)

used to invoke the protection of individuals of the Jinn, so that they increased them in revolt (against Allah);

7. And indeed they supposed, even as ye suppose, that Allah would not raise anyone (from, the dead) —

8. And (the Jinn who had listened to the Qur’ân said): We had sought the heaven but had found it filled with strong warders and meteors.

9. And we used to sit on places (high) therein to listen. But he who listeneth now findeth a flame in wait for him;1

10. And we know not whether harm is boded unto all who are in the earth, or whether their Lord intendeth guidance for them.

11. And among us there are righteous folk and among us there are far from that. We are sects having different rules.

12 And we know that we cannot escape from Allah in the earth, nor can we escape by flight.

13. And when we heard the guidance, we believed therein, and whoso believeth in his Lord, he feareth neither loss nor oppression.

14. And there are among us some who have surrendered (to Allah) and there are among us some who are unjust. And whoso hath surrendered to Allah, such have taken the right path purposefully.

15. And as for those who are unjust, they are firewood for hell.

16. If they (the idolaters) tread the right path, We shall give them to drink of water in abundance

17. That We may test them thereby, and whoso turneth away from the remembrance of his Lord; He will thrust him into ever-growing torment.

1 About the time of the Prophet’s mission there were many meteors and other strange appearances in the heavens, which, tradition says, frightened the astrologers from the high observatories where they used to watch at night, and threw out all their calculations.

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Marmaduke Pickthall, The Meaning of The Glorious Koran. An Explanatory Translation, Alfred A. Knopf, New York, Consulted online at “Quran Archive - Texts and Studies on the Quran” on 09 Dec. 2022: http://quran-archive.org/explorer/marmaduke-pickthall/1930?page=620